What is the purpose of phosphate binders?

Background: Phosphate binders are used to reduce positive phosphate balance and to lower serum phosphate levels for people with chronic kidney disease (CKD) with the aim to prevent progression of chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD).

What do phosphate binders do?

To reduce the amount of phosphate you absorb from your food you may have been prescribed a medicine called a phosphate binder. Phosphate binders work by binding (attaching) to some of the phosphate in food. This will reduce the amount of phosphate being absorbed into your blood stream.

What do binders do for kidney patients?

Phosphate binders are prescribed to dialysis patients to help prevent extra phosphorus from being absorbed from food into the bloodstream.

What do phosphate binders do to calcium?

The next phosphate binders to be introduced were the calcium-containing binders, such as calcium carbonate and calcium citrate. These drugs, which are still used extensively, have the advantage of inhibiting phosphate absorption while providing the patient with a required mineral, calcium.

How does a phosphate binder work and when should it be taken?

Phosphate binders work in your gut like magnets to pull phosphorus out of the food you eat and then pass it out through your stool. Take them when the phosphorus is present— while you eat or as soon as you fin- ish your meal or snack.

When should phosphorus binders be taken?

Phosphorus binders help to pass excess phosphorus out of the body in the stool, reducing the amount of phosphorus that gets into the blood. Usually phosphate binders are taken within 5 to 10 minutes before or immediately after meals and snacks.

Why do kidney patients need phosphate binders?

Phosphate binders are used to reduce positive phosphate balance and to lower serum phosphate levels for people with chronic kidney disease (CKD) with the aim to prevent progression of chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD).

What are examples of phosphate binders?

  • Calcium-containing phosphate binders. …
  • Aluminium-containing phosphate binders. …
  • Sevelamer hydrochloride. …
  • Lanthanum carbonate. …
  • Sucroferric oxyhydroxide. …
  • Other phosphate binders.
  • How many phosphate binders should I take?

    Most people reached their phosphorus goal with 3 to 4 tablets per day. Usually phosphate binders are taken within minutes before or immediately after meals and snacks.

    Are phosphorus binders safe?

    Common phosphate binders

    Currently, the commonly used phosphate binders are calcium carbonate, calcium acetate, sevelamer hydrochloride, lanthanum carbonate, and magnesium hydroxide. These binders are reasonably safe and moderately bind dietary phosphates.

    What are the side effects of phosphate binders?

    In common with all oral phosphate binders, lanthanum carbonate causes some GI side effects in around 20% of patients, but these seem to be relatively minor in most (abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and constipation).

    How much phosphorus do binders remove?

    (1) Approximately 60% of naturally occurring phosphorus is absorbed by the intestinal tract. (20-22) Conventional hemodialysis removes approximately 800 mg of phosphorus per treatment or 2400 mg/week. (19,23,24) As a result, phosphorus binders must bind about 250 mg/d of phosphorus to maintain balance.