What does NNT mean?


What is the meaning of NNT?

Number Needed to Treat

The Number Needed to Treat (NNT) is the number of patients you need to treat to prevent one additional bad outcome (death, stroke, etc.). For example, if a drug has an NNT of 5, it means you have to treat 5 people with the drug to prevent one additional bad outcome.

What is a normal NNT?

As a general rule of thumb, an NNT of 5 or under for treating a symptomatic condition is usually considered to be acceptable and in some cases even NNTs below 10. Below are some NNTs for routine medical interventions.

What is NNT used for?

It is a simple statistical concept called the “Number-Needed-to-Treat”, or for short the ‘NNT’. The NNT offers a measurement of the impact of a medicine or therapy by estimating the number of patients that need to be treated in order to have an impact on one person.

How do I get NNT?

NNTs are always rounded up to the nearest whole number and accompanied as standard by the 95% confidence interval . Example: if a drug reduces the risk of a bad outcome from 50% to 40%, the ARR = 0.5 – 0.4 = 0.1. Therefore, the NNT = 1/ARR = 10.

What does an NNT of 10 mean?

The number needed to treat (NNT) is the number of patients that are needed to treat to prevent 1 additional adverse outcome (e.g., stroke, death). For example, if a drug has an NNT of 10, it means 10 people must be treated with the drug to prevent 1 additional adverse outcome.