What are the basic stages of emotional development?

3 Major emotional stages in childhood development

  • Noticing emotions: Birth to one. There are a lot of different theories about how emotions develop and function. …
  • Expressing emotions: Two to three. …
  • Managing emotions: Three to five.

What are the 3 stages of emotional child development?


By seven months a child will show fear anger defiance. And even possibly shyness. By eight months a baby is better at identifying emotions. And as a result can experience mixed emotional states.

What are the stages of emotional development in infancy?

Infants begin showing a spontaneous “social smile” around age 2 to 3 months, and begin to laugh spontaneously around age 4 months. In addition, between ages 2 and 6 months, infants express other feelings such as anger, sadness, surprise, and fear. Between ages 5 and 6 months, babies begin to exhibit stranger anxiety.

What are the 5 stages of development?

Five Stages of Child Development

  • Newborn. During the first month of life, newborns exhibit automatic responses to external stimuli. …
  • Infant. Infants develop new abilities quickly in the first year of life. …
  • Toddler. …
  • Preschool. …
  • School age.


What are the main forms of emotional development in the first five years of life?

The first five years of life are a period of incredible growth in all areas of a child’s development.



Social & Emotional Milestones

  • Shows feelings by crying.
  • Uses face and body to show you how he/she is feeling.
  • Shows interest in watching your face.
  • Quiets in response to your touch.


How many stages are there in emotional development?

The presentation is based on the Eight Stages of Development developed by the psychiatrist, Erik Erikson in 1956.

What are the 7 stages of development?

There are seven stages a human moves through during his or her life span. These stages include infancy, early childhood, middle childhood, adolescence, early adulthood, middle adulthood and old age.

What is meant by emotional development?

Emotional development involves learning what feelings and emotions are, understanding how and why they occur, recognising your own feelings and those of others, and developing effective ways for managing those feelings.

What is emotional development and examples?

Skills like bouncing back from being teased or sitting still in a group to listen to a story are all examples of healthy social and emotional development. They involve the ability to manage feelings and impulses which are needed to grow and learn.

What is emotional development in infants and toddlers?

Through early relationships with nurturing and responsive adults, infants and toddlers learn how to be in relationships, how to get their needs and wants met, and how to identify and regulate emotions. Since these skills develop together, this area of development is referred to as social-emotional development.

How do you develop emotional development?

Start by being supportive.

  1. Love your child and show your affection for them. …
  2. Encourage your child to try new things. …
  3. Give your child opportunities to play with other children their age. …
  4. Show your feelings. …
  5. Establish daily routines. …
  6. Acknowledge your child’s feelings.


What are the emotional development in adolescence?

Adolescents may show signs of stress, anxiety, or depression such as increased irritability or anger, changing sleeping and eating habits, dropping favorite activities, or feelings of loneliness. Resources are available to those experiencing an emotional crisis.

How many stages are there in emotional development who proposed it?

Erikson maintained that personality develops in a predetermined order through eight stages of psychosocial development, from infancy to adulthood. During each stage, the person experiences a psychosocial crisis which could have a positive or negative outcome for personality development.

What are the 8 stages of development?

Understanding Erikson’s 8 Stages of Development

  • Infancy – Basic trust versus mistrust.
  • Toddler – Autonomy versus shame and doubt.
  • Preschool-age – Initiative versus guilt.
  • School-age – Industry versus inferiority.
  • Adolescence – Identity versus identity confusion.
  • Young adulthood – Intimacy versus isolation.